Home Law Firm The Ontario Court of Appeal dismissed a lawsuit against a Spanish law firm over loss of patent applications

The Ontario Court of Appeal dismissed a lawsuit against a Spanish law firm over loss of patent applications

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The Ontario Court of Appeal dismissed a lawsuit against a Spanish law firm over loss of patent applications

The motion judge dismissed GlycoBioSciences’ action, which the Superior Court upheld on appeal. The appeal court found that the corporation has not identified any error in the motion judge’s reasons. The appellant GlycoBioSciences bore the burden of establishing a presumptive connecting factor that established, on a prima facie basis, a real and substantial connection between Ontario and the subject matter of the litigation.

The court clarified that the appellant was required to establish a “good argumentable case” for the factual allegation that underpinned the legal argument that would establish jurisdiction. The appeal court upheld the motion judge’s finding that the appellant had not established a good arguable case that the respondent law firm made false claims knowingly or negligently.

The court found that the appellant’s Panamanian application was terminated because of failure to pay a “substantive examination fee.” The appellant argued that its lawyer, Herrero and Associates, could have corrected the situation. However, the court accepted the law firm’s assertion that the appellant had never granted it the power of attorney that would have been a necessary precondition for taking such steps.

The court also found that the appellant had frustrated the respondent’s attempts to act on its behalf for the Costa Rican application by not providing the necessary power of attorney until it was too late. The appeal court concluded that the motion judge did not make any errors in finding no good arguable case concerning the Panamanian and Costa Rican applications.

The court ultimately attracted GlycoBioSciences’ appeal and awarded the costs of the appeal to the respondent for $26,000 all-inclusive on a substantial indemnity basis. The court emphasized that a substantial indemnity award is warranted on the appeal because of the appellant’s reckless accusations that impugned the integrity of opposing counsel and the motion judge, the imposition of an improperly voluminous record, and the respondent’s offer to settle.

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